ALICE COOPER BACKED BY FOO FIGHTERS ON JIMMY KIMMEL PERFORMANCE

Watch Alice Cooper Perform “Ballad of Dwight Fry” and “Killer” with the Foo Fighters on Jimmy Kimmel Live!

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Alice Cooper review: Adoring fans treated to classics at Thebarton Theatre

Alice Cooper Performs Dwight Fry on tour, 2017. Photo courtesy CerealKyler Photography

THERE is only one man who can combine a ballerina, a guillotine, multiple costume changes and a flagrant disregard for knife safety and turn it all into a mesmerising stage show.

That’s right, Alice Cooper and co trundled into Thebarton Theatre on Thursday evening, along with at least three semi trailers full of stage props and pyrotechnics, set to blow the minds of fans both young and old.

Along for the ride on the nation spanning “A Night with Alice Cooper” tour is original Kiss guitarist Ace Frehley who warmed up the appreciative crowd with a 50 minute opening set.

Frehley and his band look and play the part of rockstars pulled straight from the hey day of glam rock and from the very beginning engage with the audience.

The guitar pick budget alone would be staggering for the Frehley band who litter the front row with the plastic triangles like they were so much confetti.

Tearing through a tight set of Kiss hits like “Rocket Ride”, “Strange Ways” and “New York Groove” the original Space Ace cuts an imposing figure on stage and is backed up by a talented ensemble.

Frehley finished the set in style, launching into a lengthy solo on a guitar which spewed smoke onto the stage, before non chalantly changing guitars and continuing to wail as the audience sat in largely awed silence.

Before we continue to the main act let us acknowledge the ravages of time: in 2018 the band Alice Cooper will have been around for 50 years and the bands quintessential song of teenage rebellion “School’s Out For Summer” will turn 46.

For a man only months away from his 70th birthday, Vincent Furnier, known to the world as Alice Cooper, is as sprightly as a man half his age and takes his stage craft seriously.

He has assembled around him an ensemble which is world class and most importantly, genuinely look like they are having fun playing alongside each other.

The three guitarists, Tommy Henriksen, Ryan Roxie and Nita Strauss, alongside bassist Chuck Garric and drummer Glen Sobel round out the well coordinated and charismatic touring band.

Alice Cooper pioneered the shock rock genre and from the moment the curtain falls and the first creeping chords of “Brutal Planet” begin, the audience is taken on a ride through a fun house of horror tropes.

The stage is covered with creepy dolls and clown masks with Sobel perched high above on an enormous drum kit.

Making his way through classics “No More Mr Nice Guy” and “Under My Wheels”, the set list hits songs throughout Alice Cooper’s back catalogue.

Throughout the songs Alice Cooper changes costumes numerous times, waves a cash skewered rapier over the front rows, plays with knives and swords and gets electrocuted.

Crowd favorites “Poison”, “Feed My Frankenstein” and “Only Women Bleed” become full throated singalongs with the audience.

Guitarist Nita Strauss, who replaced Adelaide’s own Orianthi in touring band line up, and Sobel are both given free reign on lengthy solo’s with Sobel’s drawing rabid praise from the crowd.

Somewhere along the way a ballerina appears on stage for a brief interlude of interpretive dance and Alice Cooper is placed in a straight jacket and decapitated with a guillotine, but really, all of this was to be expected with a live show of this caliber.

For an encore the band performs “Schools out for Summer” complete with singalong and brief lapse into Pink Floyd’s “Another Brick in the Wall”.

As inflatable balls drop from the ceiling Alice Cooper swings with care and abandon with a katana, popping the balls, before sticking the blade point down into the stage.

Five decades have done little to slow Alice Cooper down.

The stage show is scripted and dramatic and the man behind the mask himself is the consummate showman.

A day will come in the future when Alice Cooper hangs up his top hat and tails, a day the make up removal industry is no doubt dreading, and calls an end to extensive touring.

Until then the best advice is to catch Alice Cooper whenever and however you can because it is a live show like no other.

 

REVIEW – SMH.COM – Alice Cooper: King of the macabre retains his sense of humour and horror

SOURCE:  SMH.COM

Alice Cooper
October 21, Hordern Pavilion
Reviewed by Lilen Pautasso
★★★★

A curtain painted with a freakish face hides the stage. The room is dark and then – suddenly – the eyes on the curtain dramatically light up, changing from white to red as a familiar voice says, “You have been chosen to spend the night with Alice Cooper.”

Alice Cooper may be getting older but his defining sense of theatricality remains.

Alice Cooper may be getting older but his defining sense of theatricality remains. Photo: Katherine Woods

The curtain falls and there he is, standing atop a podium in tightly clad leathers, his long black hair and black eyes visible from the farthest seat in the room. Alice Cooper soaks up the roar of the crowd, a wall of fire behind him, then shouts, “Sydney, this is where your death begins!” as Brutal Planet kicks things off.

Make no mistake: Cooper’s shows are the definition of morbid theatre. His renowned love of horror manifests in a performance akin to a Halloween special: you witness his death, his transformation into a monster, his elaborate escape from a straitjacket and more. It’s an eccentric, elaborate journey that has made him the king of the macabre for five decades.

His band comprised a talented line-up, notably drummer Glen Sobel and guitarists Ryan Roxie and Nita Strauss. Each grasped their spots in the limelight, performing captivating solos and making their mark on each song. Strauss, the only woman on the stage, especially impressed with her scintillating guitar solo between Woman of Mass Distraction and Poison.

Cooper continued through his greatest hits: No More Mr Nice GuyDepartment of YouthPainBillion Dollar Babies – a set list made for the ultimate fan. (The only song he played from latest album Paranormal was Paranoiac Personality.)

Naturally, anticipation is always high for particular songs, especially if you’ve seen Cooper live before, such as his electrocution and transformation into a monster during Feed My FrankensteinI Love the Dead, where he is captured, dragged to a guillotine and dramatically beheaded; and the euphoric conclusion of School’s Out, complete with gigantic balloons, streamers and confetti.

He may be getting older, slower and losing the grit in his voice, but his mix of horror and humour and defining sense of theatricality defiantly remain. It’s what makes him superb. It’s what makes him Alice Cooper.

REVIEW - FORBES.COM - Alice Cooper Floored Australia With Classic Cuts at Sydney's Hordern Pavilion

When Alice Cooper spoke with Forbes writer Steve Baltin back in July, he revealed that he didn’t know his newest album Paranormal had a central theme while he was writing it. But on Saturday night at Hordern Pavilion, in Sydney, Australia, the rocker demonstrated that his nearly five-decade long career has been one elegantly unspooling concept project.

Alice Cooper in Sydney, Australia. Photo by Laura Studarus

It wasn’t so much the ubiquitous makeup, opening show pyrotechnics, or even the truckload of props featured in nearly every song. (Coupled with a backing band featuring Chuck Garric, Ryan Roxie, Nita Strauss, Tommy Henriksen, and Glen Sobel, this provided the sixty-nine-year-old musician recovery periods after more intensive songs. It was perhaps the only concession made to his age.)

From Lady Gaga (who Cooper has been known to cover) to U2 (who’s Larry Mullen Jr worked with Cooper on his newest release) plenty of bands have proved that elements of glam/shock rock are still alive and well. But Cooper does it better than most thanks to an intense dedication to the craft. It’s because of that the musician managed to sport a snake before Britney made it cool, jumped out a coffin on the Muppet Show, and curated a rumor mill that claimed he threw a live chicken into the audience. (Which since has been debunked).

It isn’t just his music (although many would argue its inherit strengths) but rather its packaging that helped push the project forward. Think dark visuals full of macabre visual themes that are—without fail—theatrical. Unsurprising then, that the curtain at the Hordern dropped to reveal a set populated with creepy dolls, a play on the tour’s nightmare theme and a call back to his 1973 album Billion Dollar Babies. That his many costume changes included a top hat and walking stick (a combination that dates back to the 1970s and once sold on ebay for over $1700). And that the dramatic stage work during “Feed My Frankenstein” would have surely have left Wayne and Garth leading a few rounds of “We’re not worthy.”

The leather and vintage tour shirt-clad audience ate it up. And of course, why wouldn’t they? It’s yet another twist on the same spectral they’ve been enjoying since the release of Cooper’s debut album Pretties For You. Thanks to the help of manager Shep Gordon (the subject of Mike Myer’s Supermensch documentary) Cooper was creating a personal brand long before the term was given a hashtagable name. Even now, it appears like there’s still more where that came from.

Check out Alice Cooper’s upcoming tour dates here.

ALICE COOPER ANNOUNCES NEW 2018 TOUR DATES!

ALICE COOPER ANNOUNCED NEW TOUR DATES FOR 2018 AS PART OF “A PARANORMAL EVENING WITH ALICE COOPER”!  SEE THE NEWLY ANNOUNCED DATES BELOW!

DATE

CITY

VENUE

ONSALE DATE

TICKET LINK

3/1/18

Windsor, ON

The Colosseum at Caesar’s

10/13/17

http://bit.ly/2fZaRwa

3/2/18

Rama, ON

Casino Rama

10/14/17

http://bit.ly/2ywk4Ug

3/4/18

Baltimore, MD

The Lyric Theatre

10/13/17

http://bit.ly/2xnMuep

3/5/18

Englewood, NJ

Bergen Performing Arts Center

10/13/17

http://bit.ly/2hUl3Xf

3/6/18

Boston, MA

Boch Center Wang Theatre

10/13/17

http://bit.ly/2ytVq6M

3/8/18

Uncasville, CT

Mohegan Sun Arena

10/13/17

http://bit.ly/2xnEOO8

3/9/18

Morristown, NJ

Mayo Performing Arts Center

10/13/17

http://bit.ly/2kwfYpk

3/10/18

Wilkes-Barre, PA

FM Kirby Center

10/13/17

http://bit.ly/2fQUzly

3/13/18

Moline, IL

TaxSlayer Center

10/13/17

http://bit.ly/2yNrFde

3/14/18

Madison, WI

Orpheum Theater

10/13/17

http://bit.ly/2xnbAii

3/15/18

South Bend, IN

Morris Performing Arts Center

11/17/17

http://bit.ly/2rVwr8g

3/17/18

Cherokee, NC

Harrah’s Cherokee Event Center

10/13/17

http://bit.ly/2y0hZNm

3/18/18

Jacksonville, FL

Florida Theatre

10/13/17

http://bit.ly/2wDdF5r

3/20/18

Melbourne, FL

King Center

10/13/17

http://bit.ly/2y0VTKU

3/21/18

Ft. Lauderdale, FL

Broward Center for The Performing Arts

10/13/17

http://bit.ly/2wDzy4i

3/23/18

Clearwater, FL

Ruth Eckerd Hall

10/13/17

http://bit.ly/2y0KElF

3/24/18

Orlando, FL

Hard Rock Live

10/13/17

http://bit.ly/2xZzXzx

3/26/18

Greenville, SC

Bon Secours Wellness Arena

10/13/17

http://bit.ly/2fQ3tzz

3/28/18

Louisville, KY

Palace Theatre

10/13/17

http://bit.ly/2ghnAXT

3/29/18

Indianapolis, IN

Murat Theatre

10/13/17

http://bit.ly/2fQQ4aq

 

 

ALICE COOPER INTERVIEW WITH REVOLVER MAGAZINE

PHOTO BY ROB FENN

SOURCE – REVOLVER

Alice Cooper is in Pittsburgh today for the latest stop on his tour with English rock legends Deep Purple and white-haired bluesman Edgar Winter. In addition to sawing off stone-cold classics like “I’m Eighteen,” “Billion Dollar Babies” and “School’s Out,” the original king of 1970s shock rock will play a cut or two from his 27th (!) and latest album Paranormal, which features guest shots from ZZ Top’s Billy Gibbons, Deep Purple’s Roger Glover and the surviving members of the original Alice Cooper band. But the most unexpected guest of all has to be U2’s Larry Mullen, who plays drums on nine of the record’s 12 tracks. “Larry really changed the sound of the album,” Coop tells Revolver. “When you get a drummer that comes in and says, ‘Let me see the lyrics,’ that’s pretty different. And he doesn’t play the way a normal 4/4 drummer would play — he changes things up — which inspires you to change the way that you write a little bit.”

At 69, Coop seems to have more energy than most 19-year-olds, putting in hour-plus performances every night while playing a round of golf every morning before the show. “I shot one over [par] today,” he enthuses. “I’ve been in that groove lately: The shows have been excellent and golf has been excellent. I know the show is always gonna be excellent, but golf can go up or down.”

READ THE FULL ARTICLE ON REVOLVER HERE