ALICE COOPER MANAGER SHEP GORDON GIVES THUMBS UP TO HBO'S 'VINYL'

SOURCE: Billboard.com

Alice Cooper performs at John Varvatos Detroit Store Opening Party hosted by Chrysler on April 16, 2015 in Detroit, Michigan.
TASOS KATOPODIS/GETTY IMAGES FOR JOHN VARVATOS

Gordon’s Alive Enterprises even loaned the producers Cooper’s guillotine for a scene on the show.

HBO’s Vinyl, the new series helmed by Martin Scorsese and Mick Jagger, has received mixed reviews from music execs for its depiction of the early ’70s record business. Manager Shep Gordon, however, is a fan of the show and was pleased by its recent depiction Alice Cooper, his long-time client, in Episode 3 of the series. Gordon’s Alive Enterprises even loaned the producers Cooper’s guillotine for a scene on the show.

In the episode titled “Whispered Secrets,” Cooper’s character — played by Dustin Ingram — is courted by young American Century A&R weasel Clark Morelle (Jack Quaid), who tries to convince the frontman to leave the band that bears his name for a solo career. It’s a scene that Gordon says never happened, although Cooper did eventually split from the band, following the success of the 1973 album Billion Dollar Babies.

“If you got a million miles away to Mars, then it was accurate,” Gordon quips. “But in that moment, it wasn’t. I think the story has been told over and over again. It didn’t come out of an A&R guy’s thing. It really came out of each of the guys having the desire to do their own things.” Coincidentally, Gordon adds, Cooper and original band members guitarist Michael Bruce and drummer Neal Smith are writing together in Phoenix this week.

While Vinyl didn’t stick to the facts about Cooper’s real-life story, Gordon acknowledges that it is based in some fact. “I saw A&R guys pitching lead singers every day of the week at the Roxy or the Whisky,” he says. “As soon as a band got successful, these guys would come like locusts, telling everybody anything they wanted to hear, and I’m sure that’s the stuff they were saying behind closed doors.”

READ MORE AT BILLBOARD.COM

ALICE COOPER IN ROLLING STONE – 5 SONGS I WISH I’D WRITTEN

SOURCE: ROLLINGSTONE.COM

The godfather of shock rock on the brilliance of “Smells Like Teen Spirit” and why My Chemical Romance is the “next Def Leppard”

For a 68-year-old, Alice Cooper remains surprisingly relevant. He opened for Mötley Crüe on their final tour last year, rocked the 2016 Grammys with Hollywood Vampires and appeared on Sunday’s installment of Vinyl (an episode named after his classic 1973 LP Billion Dollar Babies). We caught up with the veteran shock-rock visionary to get his take on five songs he’d love to have written.

CHECK OUT ALICE’S LIST HERE: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/lists/alice-cooper-five-songs-i-wish-id-written-20160301#ixzz42RjILzUz

VINYL RECAP: EPISODE THREE – ALICE COOPER IN GOLF WHITES MAKES IT ALL WORTHWHILE

SOURCE – THEGUARDIAN.COM

Clark Morelle courts Alice Cooper

EXCERPT:

“…Unlike previous weeks, the Stars in their Eyes treatment of the greats – this week, Alice Cooper – proved one of the episode’s strongest strands. Not least because Dustin Ingram does a passable impersonation and because it was delicious to see creepy Clark get his comeuppance. Plus the sight of Alice Cooper in golf whites is as funny in a questionable prestige drama as it is in real life. Most of all, he had an arc of his own rather than just a cameo, taking down the American Century schmuck with wit and gusto.

The joke, of course, is that for all his guys-together protests, the real Vincent Furnier would take Clark’s advice to the letter just two years later, ditching the band and keeping the name Alice Cooper as a solo artist. He later explained: “It got very basically down to the fact that we had drawn as much as we could out of each other. After 10 years, we were pretty much dry together.” Here’s solo Alice performing I Love the Dead, the song we saw the band soundcheck, years later.”

READ THE FULL REVIEW AT THEGUARDIAN.COM

GIBSON deems Alice Cooper's Billion Dollar Babies Classic Album Of The Month

gibsonSOURCE: Gibson.com

It’s impossible to overstate how popular Alice Cooper (the original band, not just “Alice” the singer) had become by the time Billion Dollar Babies hit record stores on February 25, 1973. Beginning with Love it to Death, the band’s 1971 breakthrough LP, the group had grown into a juggernaut that dominated the American rock and roll landscape. The sheer chemistry of the band—which featured Michael Bruce and Glen Buxton on guitars, Dennis Dunaway on bass, Neal Smith on drums, and “Alice” on vocals—had evolved through such colossal hits as “Eighteen” and “School’s Out.” Billion Dollar Babies marked the apex of that evolution, even as the group began to parody the “shock rock” theatrics that had helped bring them to such lofty heights.

billion

Listening to Billion Dollar Babies today, it’s clearer than ever that Alice Cooper transcended the novelty tag that some tried to pin on the band at the time. An intensely collaborative unit, the group had sharpened their songwriting skills to perfection, churning out radio-friendly anthems, dirge-y ballads and the occasional stylistic detour with sure-handed finesse. Two hits from Billion Dollar Babies—“No More Mr. Nice Guy” and “Elected”—showcased Bruce’s mastery of hook-laden guitar riffs. And while guitar greats Steve Hunter and Dick Wagner served as backups, the ailing Glen Buxton continued to contribute his distinctive lead work.

“Glen’s main guitar was a white SG with three humbuckers and a Bigsby B-5 tremolo,” recalls Smith, “and Michael played an SG–a burgundy one–as well. They each had a really different sound, especially on-stage. Michael had a big, meaty, solid sound, whereas Glen liked to use the tremolo bar a lot. There was lot more jazz in Glen’s playing.”

Smith continues: “Michael and Glen orchestrated their guitar parts. On some songs they played the same line, but one might be an octave different from the other. And sometimes, instead of two guitars playing harmony, Glen would play in a way that would reinforce the bass guitar. That was something he did that was really different.”

The initial sessions for Billion Dollar Babies took place at the Galecie Estate, a Greenwich, Connecticut-based mansion purchased by the band soon after recording their 1972 album, School’s Out. For songs such as “Slick Black Limousine” (one of the bonus tracks included on the deluxe version of the album), the group ran a microphone into an empty greenhouse room built with marble floors and glass walls, in order to capture a natural echo effect. In other instances, rooms of various sizes–usually very small–were miked to achieve particular vocal sounds. Later, the group traveled to Morgan Studios in London to work on additional tracks. During those proceedings a Who’s Who of rock stars converged on the sessions, but only Donovan Leitch (who sang with Cooper on the title song) was sober enough to make a contribution.

READ THE REST AT GIBSON.COM

PRESS FROM HOLLYWOOD VAMPIRES GRAMMY PERFORMANCE

VILLAGE VOICE
HERE’S WHY THE HOLLYWOOD VAMPIRES’ LEMMY TRIBUTE AT THE GRAMMYS WAS ACES
BY KATHERINE TURMAN

Here's Why the Hollywood Vampires’ Lemmy Tribute at the Grammys Was Aces

Alice Cooper photo: Kyler Clark / Lemmy photo: Robert John

“Alice Cooper and Lemmy Kilmister were peers and friends who spent many of their hard-drinking years ensconced — albeit separately and a few decades apart — on barstools at the iconic Rainbow Bar & Grill on the Sunset Strip in West Hollywood.”


ROLLING STONE
HOLLYWOOD VAMPIRES SALUTE LEMMY WITH FIERY GRAMMY TRIBUTE
BY KORY GROW

Hollywood Vampires; Concert; U.S.

Hollywood Vampires, which features Alice Cooper, Johnny Depp and Joe Perry, have announced their first U.S. tour date this year Jeff Kravitz/Getty
Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/hollywood-vampires-announce-first-u-s-concert-this-year-20160216#ixzz40Rqes2wb
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“The supergroup Hollywood Vampires, which features Alice Cooper, Johnny Depp, Joe Perry and Duff McKagan, among others, paid tribute to late Motörhead frontman Lemmy Kilmister at the Grammy Awards Monday night. The group added some harmony to the growly hard rockers’ calling card, “Ace of Spades,” as Cooper and McKagan sang together in tribute to the vocalist and bassist who died in December. Depp and Perry played opposing solos, and Kilmister’s face graced a giant screen behind them as they played.”

Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/hollywood-vampires-salute-lemmy-with-fiery-grammy-tribute-20160215#ixzz40RpuLT2H
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BILLBOARD
HOLLYWOOD VAMPIRES PAY TRIBUTE TO LEMMY KILMISTER AT THE 2016 GRAMMYS
BY DENISE WARNER

“Hollywood Vampires made their television debut at the 2016 Grammys.

The band, comprised of Alice Cooper, Joe Perry and Johnny Depp with Duff McKagan and Matt Sorum, performed for the 58th annual ceremony.”

Alice Cooper, Joe Perry and Johnny Depp of Hollywood Vampires attend The 58th GRAMMY Awards at Staples Center on Feb. 15, 2016 in Los Angeles, California.
LESTER COHEN/WIREIMAGE


HUFFINGTON POST
JOHNNY DEPP ROCKS THE 2016 GRAMMYS WITH SUPERGROUP HOLLYWOOD VAMPIRES
BY COLE DELBYCK

KEVIN WINTER VIA GETTY IMAGES
Guitarist Johnny Depp of music group The Hollywood Vampires performs onstage during The 58th GRAMMY Awards at Staples Center on February 15, 2016 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Kevin Winter/WireImage)

“Goodbye, Johnny Depp the actor. And hello, Johnny Depp the rocker.

Depp took over the Grammys stage with legends Alice Cooper and Joe Perry as the rock supergroup Hollywood Vampires on Monday night in their first televised performance.”

Hollywood Vampires – Bad As I Am Lyric Premiere!

HV Bad As I Am Single ArtworkLyric premiere for the new song by The Hollywood Vampires ”Bad As I Am,” off the deluxe album, which comes out this Friday February 12th.

“Here’s to you
As good as you are
Here’s to me
As bad as I am
As good as you are, as bad as I am
I’m as good as you are
As bad as I am”

See the full lyrics here: http://bit.ly/BadAsIAmLyrics